Associate Guide – Harry Walker 2017-03-29T20:53:56+00:00

Harry Walker

In a photo career that’s spanned more than 40 years, Harry Walker has had lots of different jobs including resident photographer for the South Street Seaport Museum in New York and running an old-time portrait studio in Skagway Alaska. He has photographed wild and not-so-wild places worldwide and his photographs have been published in many magazines and newspapers including Audubon, National Wildlife, National Geo, Backpacker, Alaska Magazine, Forbes, The New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. His work has been featured in books on subjects as diverse as the Galapagos Islands, the trans-Alaska pipeline, and what to see and do in Chicago. Born and raised in New York City, Harry came to Alaska in 1975 to do a solo canoe trip down the nearly 2,000-mile Yukon River. He moved to Alaska permanently in 1979 and has since written and photographed four books on Alaska including the best-selling Outhouses of Alaska (now in its 11th printing). Teaching photography has always been a part of Harry’s life. In fact his first photography job was teaching a night course at a New York City college. While still living in New York Harry traveled with an industry-funded trade show sharing his love of photography with people around the U.S. For nearly 35 years, he has worked with children in bush schools (some with fewer than 15 students) as part of Alaska’s Artist in School Program. The cornerstone of Harry’s photography has been his curiosity about the world around him. “I don’t know whether my curiosity has drawn me toward photography or my passion for photography has made me more curious. Maybe a little of both.” Today, in addition to leading the Anchorage PhotoWalk Harry focuses on stock photography related to nature, wildlife and tourism. You can see more of Harry’s work at harrymwalker.com.

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Harry is the lead guide for Anchorage PhotoWalk, a 2.5-hour excursion from Anchorage’s historic city center to the Ship Creek Overlook by way of the scenic Tony Knowles Coastal Trail.