Art of Seeing

Photography | The Art of Seeing and Sharing

At the peak of film photography in 1999, Kodak estimated 80 billion photos were taken that year. It’s difficult to get a firm number of the amount snapped annually today, but considering what’s shared across social media platforms, it’s got to be in the trillions. No doubt about it, humans are an image driven species… but why?

No one can ever know how exactly someone else perceives the world. Photography is the closest we get to seeing through another’s eyes, and sharing what we see through our own. When multiple photographers shoot the same scene or subject, there’s a good chance the results will be incredibly diverse. Each one will see the it differently and render it in their own image with the tools at hand. Even back in film days, photographers manipulated photos to best express a feeling they had while capturing the scene, or a mood they were trying evoke. Ansel Adams was known to use a post processing technique called dodging and burning, which is still used in digital darkrooms today. It brought out a greater range of values in the photograph, which Adams felt this was necessary to impart the sense of awe he felt when viewing grandiose scenes.

Technology has come a long way since then and even the most inexperienced photographers can now take, and instantly share stunning photos. This truth was illustrated during a Twilight Photo Tour last early fall. An elderly woman with movement limitations elected to stay close to the van at a tour stop that involved climbing stairs. While waiting for the group to return, she took a series of photos with her iPhone. Although she had remained within 100 feet of the van for a 20 minute period, she managed to capture stunning images, including a detail of yarrow and red clover still in bloom, topped with the first dainty snowflakes of the season. While the rest of the group traipsed by these unnoticed gems, she was spent time really looking at what was at hand, and using her iPhone to express how it made her feel. Of course one need not have a camera in hand to notice and appreciate subtle beauty, but there’s something to be said for having the ability to instantly capture and share your own unique vision of the world.

~Jody

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Alaska Photo Treks operates a variety of photo-centric tours, workshops and classes, including Sunset Photo Safari and it’s winter counterpart, Twilight Photo Tour. Each are 4-hour excursions designed to make the most of the best light of the day. Also, Anchorage Aurora Quest; providing opportunity to see and photograph northern lights in Southcentral Alaska, from September through March. 

By | 2017-05-27T13:23:30+00:00 November 6th, 2016|Photography Tours and Workshops|0 Comments

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